postpresence:

on Shabazz Muhammad: i’m afraid that his future is to become the best power forward in Euroleague history.

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the thing about Shabazz is that he’s still bigger and stronger than anyone he’s likely to match up with at the two, but he’s too slow-footed to keep up with most twos and too small for most threes. on top of that he still has a tendency to gamble on the big breakaway steal, which is crazy and i honestly thought he’d grow out of after playing mostly for highlights at UCLA

i think he could’ve averaged 15 rebounds a game in college but he felt 15 rebounds wouldn’t get him on Sportscenter or win him an MVP trophy and this is still symptomatic of the way he approaches the game on the NBA level

on Shabazz Muhammad: i’m afraid that his future is to become the best power forward in Euroleague history.

rather than one big dreadful post that i am terrified to tackle, i’ve broken up my thoughts on summer league into several loosely-connected collections of notes. here is the first of them, regarding a once highly-coveted (and more recently undrafted) hulk of the SEC.

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on Patric Youngat some point during every match involving 12-time world champion Randy Orton, WWE color commentator John Bradshaw Layfield takes a moment to make note of a personal belief/verbal meme that goes something like this: "If you could make a WWE superstar from scratch, that superstar would look like Randy Orton". well if the NBA summer league is the WWE, abrim with hungry young superstars fighting for their careers and riddled with narrative inconsistencies (and featuring the occasional high spot amid the botchfest), i posit this: If you could build a power forward from scratch, that power forward would look like Patric Young.

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Young passes the eye test with flying colors. he has veins in his arms thicker in width than most people’s wrists, and he stands at a statuesque 6’9. standing courtside during warmups he sincerely looked like he’d been cut from stone, or carved from marble, or otherwise crafted through some similarly strenuous process that takes a colossal and unwieldy slab of minerals and shapes it to appear smooth and graceful. except anyone that’s seen Young bobble an entry pass or whiff on a baby hook knows how appearances can deceive. they will tell you that if any part of him is for sure made of stone it’s his hands. he’s rigid and lacks the explosiveness and fluidity required of most rotation bigs who are complete liabilities on offense. his ineffectiveness around the basket was something he was never able to improve much upon during his four years at Florida, and it’s these offensive deficiencies that contributed most to scouts’ waning interest in him following what was a promising sophomore season.

all of that said, his strengths have been and will remain to be his size, motor and instincts on the defensive end; with the league continuing to trend toward “perimeter ball”, i was surprised to see such a mobile and capable defensive big go undrafted. for however much he may lack on the scoring end of the court, Young possesses considerable potential as an interior stopgap, and with word of a contract offer from the New Orleans Pelicans he may yet get the chance to grow in that role behind a complementary veteran front court rotation of Anthony Davis, Omer Asik and Ryan Anderson.

Malik Monk Has INSANE Athleticism! 6’3 Elite Guard With GAME!

Published on Jul 21, 2014

Here is Malik Monk’s first Hoopmixtape covering his sophomore year in high school and Summer. Malik is ranked top 5 in the class of 2016.